Opera Star Baritone DAVID SERERO to perform NABUCCO’s title role from Verdi’s opera

Opera Star Baritone DAVID SERERO to perform NABUCCO’s title role from Verdi’s opera, for 5 unique performances at the Center for Jewish History, New York, in April 2016

Three Sephardic-themed productions — two Shakespeare classics and a Verdi opera — will be presented in 2016 Off-Broadway in the theater located at the Center for Jewish History (15 W. 16 St.) in New York City, starting with MERCHANT OF VENICE last January, followed by NABUCCO April 6-17 and OTHELLO June 16-30.

This trio of productions follows last year’s debut of MERCHANT OF VENICE – which uniquely includes Sephardic ladino songs incorporated into Shakespeare’s text – at the Center, marking the first time the museum and their performance space, located in Chelsea, a theater production presented by the AMERICAN SEPHARDI FEDERATION.

NABUCCO – Giuseppe Verdi’s renowned opera about the Babylonian Jews exile during Biblical times – will perform April 6-17; Baritone David Serero will star as the title role of Nabucco, featuring Rosa D’Imperio (Abigaille), Stephane Malbec Sénéchal (Ismaele), Steven Fredericks (Zaccaria),  Sara Pearson (Fenena).

Performances are :

  • April 6th at 3pm
  • April 10th at 7pm (Opening night)
  • April 12th at 8pm
  • April 14th at 8pm
  • April 17th at 8pm (Closing night)

Tickets are $26 & $36 (VIP)

Booking : asfnabucco.bpt.me or 1.800.838.3006

Other future production at the Center will be Shakespeare’s OTHELLO – which will be performed in a Jewish Moroccan tradition, bringing Shakespeare’s drama of race, deceit and murder back to its origins – will run June 14-28 starring David Serero as Othello.

David Serero is most sought after performer who is known as an “actor’s actor”. The wide variety of roles (from Opera to Classic Theatre and Broadway Musicals to Comedy) that he has played and the quality of his work have earned him a worldwide reputation as a versatile talent.

David Serero is a Parisian-born, classically trained actor and baritone, who has performed operas, pop concerts in more than 1000 concerts around the world, including at numerous venues in NYC and starred in more than 100 films. In addition to starring in MERCHANT OF VENICE last year at the Center for Jewish History, he has appeared in several musicals, Operas and classical plays, and performed sold-out solo concerts at the Snapple Theatre Center in Times Square. In 2012, he made his sold out WEST END debuts at the Dominion Theatre. In London, David performed at the Wembley stadium and at the Royal College of Music. In Paris he starred as Don Quixote from MAN OF LA MANCHA and as Happy Mac from BEGGAR’S HOLIDAY by Duke Ellington. He recorded a duet with JERMAINE JACKSON and produced his Jazz album. He performed two concerts on Times Square for Best of France. He has recorded several albums including a Frank Sinatra tribute album, SEPHARDI (an album of Sephardic songs), HABANERA (a modern version of Carmen Opera with beatboxer Mythe Box).

OPERA HIGHLIGHTS :

David Serero started his career in musicals and theater in New-York (where he lived for 3 years). Then in 2002, David Serero discovered Opera. In 2004, he moved to St Petersburg (Russia) to study at the Rimsky-Korsakov Conservatory in the Opera and in the Dramatic Theater department. That same year he made his operatic debut singing Scarpia (Tosca) and Germont (La Traviata). From his acclaimed debut, David received an invitation to be part of the prestigious Young Soloists Academy of the Mariinsky Theater in St Petersburg, Russia, founded by Valery Gergiev and directed by Larissa Gergieva. He became the first “non-Russian” to be part of the Academy. He has toured in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Russia, USA and Israel. In 2006, David Serero made his European debut singing Escamillo (Carmen), his most signature role, at the Brasov Opera in Romania, staged by Cristian Mihaielescu. David Serero received the high distinction of “Ambassador of the city of Brasov” from the Romanian government for his debut performance. In 2007, he returned to sing the parts of the Four Villains (Tales of Hoffmann) in that same company. That same year, David made his U.S debut singing Alfio (Cavalliera Rusticana) & Tonio (I Pagliacci) in Harrisburg, PA. He received critical acclaim for his acting qualities. At 26 years old, David Serero is the youngest French opera singer to make his U.S debut. (Source A.F.P). In 2008, David Serero performed the part of Escamillo (Carmen) at the Livermore Valley Opera (San Francisco, CA) staged by director James Marvel.

Invited by the conductor Richard Beswick (ex-Artistic Director and Producer of the legendary label Decca in London for 20 years), he made his France debut with Doctor Malatesta (Don Pasquale), with the Centre Philharmonic in 2008. Thanks to the Encouragement Prize that he received from the Bizet Foundation, David Serero performed the part of Zurga (Pearl Fishers) in Romania. During 2009, David Serero performed the roles of Enrico (Lucia di Lammermoor) and Escamillo (Carmen) both in Florida, USA. Mr Serero has performed the parts of General Boum (La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein / Offenbach) and the Vice-Roi (La Perichole / Offenbach), both for a total of 70 performances. David Serero participated in the OPERALIA competition (founded and directed by legendary tenor PLACIDO DOMINGO) in Hungary 2009. During this competition, David Serero was featured in a documentary of Placido Domingo broadcast on the National Hungarian TV. David Serero was chosen to perform the part of Zapata (Le Chanteur de Mexico) for the 50th celebration of the operetta in Nice 2010.


David_Serero_as_Nabucco

For more information, contact:

Website: www.davidserero.com

David_Serero_as_Nabucco_NYC

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